Create a Culture of Transparency

Even though it has its own flaws, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act or what we in Canada call bill 198 or C-Sox has helped to make organizational governance more transparent. However, we cannot rely on legislation alone. Only strength of character and sheer leadership determination will create organizational transparency. Transparency, defined by Hickman (2010) as “the disclosure of pertinent information” (p. 56), while Bennis et al. (2008) defined it as “the free flow of information within an organization” (p. 3), is quickly becoming a competitive advantage. Hickman (2010) wrote:

Written by Brock Brown Read More

Start with the Leader in the Mirror

Kouzes and Posner wrote in the 4th edition of The Leadership Challenge, “exemplary leaders know that if they want to gain commitment and achieve the highest standards, they must be models of the behavior they expect of others…to effectively model the behavior they expect of others, leaders must first be clear about guiding principles” (Kouzes and Posner, 2007, p.15). However, leaders must not only clarify their values or principles they must give voice to them; the authors further wrote, “leaders are suppose to stand up for their beliefs, so they’d better have some beliefs to stand up for” (Kouzes and Posner, 2007, p.15). Before leaders can influence anyone, they must first influence themselves.

Written by Brock Brown Read More

CEO Or Criminal

Every time I tell someone I am a CEO I get the feeling they think I am a criminal. This sad statement came from a customer who is the CEO of an international 1.5 billion dollar company; a man, whom by the way, I consider one of the most ethical leaders I know. Unfortunately, this sentiment resonates with many of my CEO clients and friends. It is a sad reflection on one aspect of leadership today in a global economy. I am not saying that all CEO’s are leaders as defined by follower trust and confidence. However, they hold positions in which they are suppose to lead.

Written by Brock Brown Read More